Stuttgart’s Finest: Swiss Collection Encompasses 25 Years of Modern Porsche

A special capsule sale from RM Sotheby’s offers unrepeatable examples of Stuttgart’s greatest hits.

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An unwritten rule about buying cars from Stuttgart is to search both ends of the timeline; chasing down either Ferdinand and Ferry Porsche’s earliest efforts or sourcing the most modern examples one can find. Unlike lesser companies, the team of engineers and designers who carried the torch of performance motoring after the elder Porsche’s untimely death in 1951 and his son Ferry’s retirement in 1989 proved that the performance-oriented spirit of the company’s namesake did not dissipate.

RM Sotheby’s is proud to celebrate this continued dedication with a Swiss-based, stand-alone single-owner collection of some of Stuttgart’s finest sports cars from the modern era as the exciting climax to our Online Only: Open Roads, February auction, with a staggered closure over 19-28 February:

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REMI DARGEGEN © 2020 COURTESY OF RM SOTHEBY’S

1995 Porsche 911 Turbo Cabriolet

Starting off with an air-cooled, turbocharged bang, this open-top 911 existed so far above other 993-generation Porsches as to be essentially nonexistent: Merely 14 were constructed by Porsche Exclusive Manufaktur at the request of Fitz Haberl, one of Porsche’s most influential dealers in Munich. With widened rear wheel arches and a factory-optional spoiler fitted, the black-on-black theme of this ultra-rare 911 is broken only by its Maroon-colored cloth top. Originally priced with an 89,500 DM premium over the non-turbocharged variant (the approximate equivalent of a $110,139 surcharge today), this example sets the tone for the rest of our list: Unapologetically extraordinary.

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REMI DARGEGEN © 2020 COURTESY OF RM SOTHEBY’S

2004 Porsche Carrera GT

Unveiled in spectacular fashion on the eve of the 2000 Paris Motor Show, the concept Carrera GT was a statement that Porsche was not beholden to the rear-engine, six-cylinder formula that built the brand’s reputation. Instead, when the production version of the Carrera GT supercar was released in 2004, it marked many milestones not simply in the history of Porsche, but in the automotive world writ large: The Carrera GT was the first production vehicle built around a carbon-fiber monocoque chassis, a foundation that makes up nearly every serious supercar today. Unlike the offerings of today, however, this U.S.-spec Fayence Yellow-over-Dark Grey Carrera GT is shifted by its driver.

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2010 Porsche 911 Sport Classic

Sometimes, a look back can provide an opportunity for reinvention. The “Classic” in this Sport Classic can easily be observed in this example’s timeless silhouette, echoing some of the dramatic highlights from the brand’s history, right down to the headline-grabbing “ducktail” spoiler. And yet, factory-equipped with a ‘Power Kit,’ the Sport Classic’s 3.8-litre, horizontally opposed, six-cylinder engine comfortably produced 408 horsepower—nearly double the 210 horsepower produced from the 2.7-litre, air-cooled engine under the original “ducktail”: The 1973 Carrera 911 RS 2.7. This example was only the twelfth ever built out of a limited run of 250 ever made. As such, the desirability among Porschephiles for the few Sport Classics released has been strong from the time it was announced. A modern icon.

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REMI DARGEGEN © 2020 COURTESY OF RM SOTHEBY’S

2014 Porsche 918 Spyder

As truly old-school Porsche followers will no doubt recognize, hybrid power has flowed in the brand’s blood since the Lohner-Porsche of 1900. Though Ferdinand Porsche’s first effort was driven by electric motors mounted in wheel hubs (a true innovation, spawningseveralmodernimitators), the elder Porsche could scarcely have conceived of the levels of power and refinement achieved by the 918 Spyder. Showing under 5,500 km from new, this tasteful, hybrid hypercar has been optioned with Porsche’s Liquid Chrome Blue Metallic over Mocha Brown leather with Silver accents—one of only three ordered in this exact specification. The perfect counterpoint to the raw emotion from the Carrera GT supercar, this 918 is proof of Porsche’s evolution into a world-class OEM that can offer both exhilarating performance and unparalleled refinement in the same forward-thinking package.

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REMI DARGEGEN © 2020 COURTESY OF RM SOTHEBY’S

2010 Porsche 911 GT2 RS

Not the first model overseen by this individual, but the first on our list, this 2010 Porsche 911 GT2 RS marks for us the introduction of a name that will no doubt one day be added to the list of greatest-ever automotive engineers: Dr. Andreas Preuninger. Reputed among the motoring press as the person who nearly single-handedly re-established Porsche performance, Dr. Preuninger has overseen every GT-branded model but one (if you have yet to see it, this recent Top Gear segment is illuminating). For this 2010 example, Dr. Preuninger achieved outright domination of the leaderboards, not only on paper, with the GT2 RS earning the title of “fastest and most powerful 997-generation 991” upon its release, but on the track as well, with the model setting a 2010 record on the Nürburgring Nordschleife that remained unbroken internally until the 991.2 Turbo S in 2017. Deeply impressive.

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REMI DARGEGEN © 2020 COURTESY OF RM SOTHEBY’S

2017 Porsche 911 R

In almost a year of compiling this semi-regular blog for RM Sotheby’s, your humble writer has tried to keep his personal preferences private, but with this example, he must confess an undeniable bias. Since serving as an editor on the English-language translation of the definitive book on the making of the modern 911 R, this writer was struck by the sincerity of the true believers within Porsche who balance respect for the brand’s history while understanding the necessity to reinvent it. Practically covered with grace notes and “Easter Eggs” instantly recognizable to Porschephiles everywhere down to the “pepita”-patterned inserts on the brown leather seats, this model was a nod to the original motorsport-inspired 911 R from 1967. For many other brands, the hint at history would be merely aesthetic, but underneath the skin existed the same GT3 RS-spec suspension and 4.0-litre powerplant that made all of Dr. Preuninger’s other output so exemplary. The most critical addition was a six-speed manual gearbox; no spoiler necessary. This example, the 401st constructed out of 991 total, is made even more extraordinary by its Paint-to-Sample Gulf Blue exterior.

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2018 Porsche 911 GT2 RS

Proving exactly the ethos of individualism that has from the beginning been integral to the Porsche brand, this RennSport-spec, Paint-to-Sample Porsche 911 GT2 RS was ordered new in this striking shade of Azzurro California Metallic with contrasting gold-colored center-lock wheels. The outspoken exterior of the GT2 is balanced by its straightforward, motorsport-inspired interior, with adaptive sport seats trimmed in two-tone, light blue-over-black leather. Underneath the skin, Dr. Preuninger’s lightening regime truly shines, with the roof of this 911 GT2 RS fashioned from the ultimate natural material for lightweight strength: Magnesium. With carbon-fiber components used throughout this example, it is clear this colorful car makes a modern statement that the future of Porsche performance is bright.

 

Blog Author:Forest Casey
Casey is the Editorial and Marketing Content Developer at RM Sotheby’s.

Art & Home – January 2017

A new issue of Art & Home has arrived, fresh from the printers! Take a moment to scroll through these beautiful pages! http://bit.ly/2jw95Cj

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Warhol top pick at Sotheby’s best-ever $380 million auction

Art collectors dug deep into their pockets on Wednesday and smashed records for a second straight night as Sotheby’s held the biggest auction in its history, led by a record-setting $105 million work by Andy Warhol.

The auction of post-war and contemporary art totaled $380.6 million, its highest total ever, and set new auction records for major artists Cy Twombly and Brice Marden.

Of the 61 lots on offer only seven failed to sell. The total was just shy of the $394 million high pre-sale estimate.

If it was not quite the blockbuster affair that rival Christie’s staged on Tuesday, it was still an impressive result, marking the auction house’s second solid success in a row after it scored with a $290 million sale of Impressionist and modern art a week ago.

(Read more: Most expensive diamond ever sold goes for $83.2M)

The sale’s expected highlight, in particular, far exceeded expectations. Warhol’s “Silver Car Crash (Doubled Disaster),” from his seminal death and disaster series, soared to $105,445,000 including commission, 50 percent higher than the late pop artist’s previous auction record of $71.7 million.

Sotheby’s did not disclose the buyer, who was bidding by telephone. It had estimated the nearly 9-by-14-foot work from 1963 to sell for “in excess of $60 million,” but that figure turned out to be the opening bid.

Sotheby’s officials were thrilled with the results.

“How can you not be thrilled when you make the highest total in Sotheby’s history,” worldwide head of contemporary art Tobias Meyer said after the sale.

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Most expensive painting at an auction sold

CNBC’s Robert Frank reports the record for the most expensive painting by a deceased artist, as well as a living artist both sold Tuesday night. Francis Bacon’s “Three Studies of Lucian Freud” sold for $142.4 million.

Of the Warhol, Meyer, who also served as auctioneer, said “It’s a great price – and completely worth it,” adding, “It’s the best painting I’ve ever sold in my whole career.”

(Read more: Art could be drawing a disturbing economic picture)

The price was the second-highest in history for a contemporary work of art – the highest being the $142.4 million fetched by Francis Bacon’s “Three Studies of Lucian Freud” on Tuesday at Christie’s, the top auction price ever.

Auction officials at both Sotheby’s and Christie’s have said that recent price spikes were driven in part by wealthy collectors entering what is an increasingly global market.

“Global participation was evident throughout the sale,” said Alex Rotter, head of contemporary art in New York, noting that sellers from 10 countries offered works in the sale.

As to bidders, Rotter said, “When the quality is there, multiple people from different cultural backgrounds are going for it, because it’s outstanding.” Sotheby’s said 64 percent of registered bidders were from outside the United States.

(Read more: Bacon triptych sells for record $142.4 million at auction)

Sotheby’s also said there was “significant participation” from Asia and Latin America.

Other highlights of the sale included Gerhard Richter’s “A.B. Courbet”, which sold for $26.5 million and Jean-Michel Basquiat’s “Untitled (Yellow Tar and Feathers)”, which fetched $25.9 million. Both beat their $25 million high estimate.

Twombly’s “Poems to the Sea” was estimated at only $7 million but soared to $21.7 million, a record for a new artist.

 

The Luxury Real Estate Market is Making a Move

People are curious, trying to figure out what is going on with the obscure luxury markets.  But with the the volitility of the stock market and the unpredictable nature of commoditiies, it appears that scarity has momentum.

Whether rare art items, antiques, or unique luxury properties, the smart money investors are coming back to the plate and making investments in the things that can only be bought be a few.

Take note, we are on the verge of the next stabilization of the high end real estate market.  Read today’s Wall Street Journal post to read  more about this exciting market move:  http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704717004575268573660359734.html?mod=WSJ_hpp_sections_realestate”

Sotheby’s is Hitting Home Runs on Recent Auctions

There is good news for collectors of scarce and very expensive items out there.  Routinely over the past 12 months, the Sotheby’s Auction House has achieved sales results individually which are significantly higher than pre-auction estimates.   This points to a new trend of where liquid investment dollars are being placed by the super wealthy.

This article shows some of the incredible pieces and where the results have ended up: http://www.businessinsider.com/sothebys-auction-items-2010-4#brilliant-cut-rare-blue-diamond-geneva–23-million-1

Here is a link to the Sotheby’s website which shows all results.  These numbers are mystifying:   http://www.sothebys.com/app/live/event/EventResultsLanding.jsp

What Recession? Sotheby’s London sets world record

 

While the economy is battered and beaten, and real estate values are in the midst of a worldwide correction, it seems that collectors of fine art, are resetting market barriers themselves.   It is clear that SCARCITY is the common denominator between all things of value, and the recent Sotheby’s Impressionist and Modern Art sale in London, certainly demonstrates this.

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In a historic sale at Sotheby’s, Alberto Giacometti’s L’homme qui marche I (Walking Man I) set a world record for a work of art at auction when it sold for $104,327,006 . The sale of that work was swiftly followed by that of Gustav Klimt’s Kirche in Cassone, which made  $43,208,606 – a new record price for a landscape by the artist. These two works headlined a sale that realised a record-breaking total of $235,659,502  – making it the highest value sale ever staged in London.

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